Health

Drug Use and Criminal Behavior: A complete Guide

I wanted to complete my doctoral thesis on the relationship between the use/abuse of drugs and the subjects bent towards criminal behavior. It took me exactly four years to understand the link between the two. On a superficial level, we all know that one can lead to the other but with my thesis; I planned to explain this more empirically having taken a case by case study of real people.

Humans as a subject can be dicey:

One of the main reasons that this thesis of mine took so long to research and come to a logical conclusion is because I was studying humans. I had 24 people for my study and not everyone was cooperative throughout.

I am thankful to a lot of people and institutions who have been extremely helpful and instrumental in not only giving me access to important information and linking me to the right people but also those that have out of genuine academic interest circulated my work in their inner circles and also nominated it for some very prestigious awards.

Explore Ontariodrugrehabs was a project that was very close to my heart. I volunteered in rehab centers across the state to get an idea about the subject and also getting close to some of the suggested inmates.

The link between crime and drug usage is unmistakably there:

If you were to go through my research today, all my subjects have agreed to have trespassed certain laws and moral values in a bid to be able to acquire drugs or to sell drugs to be able to meet their sales targets.

Is poverty is a predominant factor?

Ninety percent of the subjects of my study testified to the fact that it was poverty that pushed them in this quagmire. Once they had a brush with the drugs, they had become habituated to it and had to resort to anti-social activities to be able to fund their drug adventures. Most of the stories resemble each other so much that there is a pattern.

My report categorically confirms that there is strong evidence to state that crime and drug usage is inadvertently related.